Hello Fall

We had our first really hard frost last night.  I harvested all the tomatoes and peppers a few days ago.  I had a sheet over one pepper plant, we’ll see if it survived.  If not, it’s not a big deal.  We had a good summer with pretty good harvests.  We had a pretty warm start to the summer with a cooler finish.  As a result we had lots of peppers, but they stayed green, not ripening to beautiful yellows and reds.  I have a big basket of green peppers.  I much prefer the super sweet flavor of a ripe Golden Treasure pepper, but the green ones are good too.  The tomatoes ripened reasonably well, giving us a lot of great tomato soups and salsas.

That’s one of the great things about gardening.  It doesn’t get old.  Every year is different.  Drought, heat, cold, winds and storms, they all bring their own challenges.  Add in critters that eat stuff, bugs that help or hurt, and the specific weather patterns that intensify everything, and you won’t find a year that is routine.  I like the challenge.  I like learning something new.  I know that each year will bring it’s own ups and downs, and I look forward to the possibility that it brings.

Fall is upon us.  The weather is cooler.  It’s time to get the garden ready to go to sleep for the winter.  Tearing out the tomatoes and peppers to prep the beds for next spring and then mulching all the roots that will overwinter.  After a summer of hard work, it’s nice to have this down time too.  The shelves are full of tomato sauce and soup, the freezers full of asparagus, peas and corn, and the basement is full of potatoes and onions.  We’ll eat well, remembering all the bounty of the garden all winter long.

3 Responses to “Hello Fall”

  1. Emilie Allen

    Hi, Annie, So that means you are not fall planting for a winter harvest? Where do you live? Can I plant your over winter plants here in Toledo, OREGON.. 7 miles off the Pacific Ocean? I have 8 planting sites (raised bed and grass areas killed with cardboard) and 18 tubs (used for potatoes this year). We have mild winters and this is my first year planting after a not warm enough summer for the peppers and tomatoes.
    After 4 years in the hot valley of southern Oregon this is definitely different. What can I do with the seeds from the garlic flower.? I am hoping I can plant them also besides the clove. Any thoughts, Annie?

  2. Emilie Allen

    tHi, Annie, So that means you are not fall planting for a winter harvest? Where do you live? Can I plant your over winter plants here in Toledo, OREGON.. 7 miles off the Pacific Ocean? I have 8 planting sites (raised bed and grass areas killed with cardboard) and 18 tubs (used for potatoes this year). We have mild winters and this is my first year planting after a not warm enough summer for the peppers and tomatoes.
    After 4 years in the hot valley of southern Oregon this is definitely different. What can I do with the seeds from the garlic flower.? I am hoping I can plant them also besides the clove. Any thoughts, Annie?

    typed the email wrong the first time…

    • Julie

      We’re in Michigan. I could be planting garlic and shallots right now, but that’s about it.

      I grew up in California, with mild winters, usually only a few days of frost.

      The garlic flower is called a scape. It’s considered a delicacy, and can also form a head of garlic after some time. I’ve heard that you have to put the whole scape on the ground and the following year will produce a clove that you then plant the next year to grow a head. I find it easier to just enjoy eating the scapes and planting cloves.